Can you pass this Science SATs paper for a 14 year old?

Can you pass this Science SATs paper for a 14 year old?

Can you pass this Science SATs paper for a 14 year old? Test yourself on these chemistry, biology and physics questions set for year 9 students

After British scientists spectacularly failed to launch a rocket into orbit this week… MailOnline is asking readers to challenge themselves with a series of science questions from a recent SAT exam for New Year’s students.

The 14-year-olds are sitting chemistry, biology and physics tests to track their progress in chemistry, biology and physics before they sit their GCSEs in Year 10 – and in the week Virgin Orbit failed to launch the first satellite in orbit since On UK soil, we could use some scientific minds.

Adults shared online maths tests this week after Rishi Sunak pledged to make the subject compulsory for all children by the age of 18, but we want to make sure you have a well-rounded education, so we’re also testing your science knowledge .

So MailOnline asks… can you solve these new year science exam questions and prove that you can know your black dots from your black holes? (Answers at bottom of page)

MailOnline challenges you to solve these New Year science exam questions and prove you can know your black dots from your black holes

MailOnline challenges you to solve these New Year science exam questions and prove you can know your black dots from your black holes

Rishi Sunak last week announced plans for every pupil in England to study some form of maths by the age of 18 to overcome the UK’s high numeracy rates.

Students will need to take “some form” of maths course offered through either new qualifications or existing qualifications such as A-levels, T-levels and Basic Maths.

Mr Sunak promised to equip children for the “jobs of the future” by ensuring they have good maths skills when they leave school.

For most driving is likely to involve practical skills rather than algebra.

Around eight million adults in England only have the numeracy skills expected of primary school children, according to government figures.

And in science news this week, the failure of the first orbital space launch from British soil was caused by a premature shutdown of the rocket, operator Virgin Orbit has revealed.

It had been deployed from under the wing of a specially adapted 747 jumbo jet, which took off from the Cornwall spaceport, flew to a designated launch area over the Atlantic and launched a booster containing nine satellites into space.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak this week announced his new plan for every pupil in England to study some form of maths by age 18.  He is pictured today during a visit to Harris Academy in Battersea, south west London.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak this week announced his new plan for every pupil in England to study some form of maths by age 18. He is pictured today during a visit to Harris Academy in Battersea, south west London.

However, organizers of the Start Me Up mission soon identified an “anomaly” and said Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne rocket had failed to reach its target orbit.

The rocket was lost and subsequent images showed it burning or breaking up in the atmosphere as it fell back to Earth off the coast of Lanzarote.

In a statement released Thursday, Virgin Orbit said initial data indicated the rocket’s first stage performed as expected, that it reached space altitudes and that stage separation and upper stage ignition occurred according to the mission plan.

LauncherOne never reached its target altitude to release a payload of nine satellites into orbit and was ultimately lost - either burning up in Earth's atmosphere or breaking up over the North Atlantic

LauncherOne never reached its target altitude to release a payload of nine satellites into orbit and was ultimately lost – either burning up in Earth’s atmosphere or breaking up over the North Atlantic

Devastating: Britain's first historic orbital space launch on UK soil failed dramatically on Monday night after Virgin Orbit revealed an

Devastating: Britain’s first historic orbital space launch on UK soil failed dramatically on Monday night after Virgin Orbit revealed an “anomaly” had prevented its rocket from reaching orbit. Pictured is the moment the rocket ignited

Later in the mission, at an altitude of approximately 111 miles (180 km), the upper stage experienced an anomaly that prematurely terminated the first burn.

Virgin Orbit said this ended the mission, the rocket components and payload falling back to Earth in the approved safety corridor without ever reaching orbit.

Sir Richard Branson’s company has launched a formal investigation into the source of the second stage failure, but said it hoped to return to the Cornwall spaceport for further launches as early as later this year.

Dan Hart, CEO of Virgin Orbit, said: “We are all disappointed that we were not able to achieve a complete mission success and provide the launch service that our customers deserve.

“Upon identifying the anomaly, our team immediately went into a pre-planned investigative mode.”

He added that Virgin Orbit had begun an internal investigation into the root causes of the failure.

The plane, named Cosmic Girl, took off from Cornwall Airport on Monday night, with hundreds of members of the public watching and more than 75,000 watching a live stream of the event.

Named after the Rolling Stones’ 1981 hit, the mission involved a repurposed Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 aircraft and Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne rocket.

WHAT ARE THE ANSWERS?

  1. (A) It’s strong; can be bent into shape; it is waterproof (b) Rust, oxidation or corrosion; The pipes are weaker, there may be rust in the water, the water may be unsuitable for drinking/dirty/contaminated; pipes will break or leak (b) Metals are good conductors; the heat travels or is absorbed by the metal
  2. (A) BEACD (b) Any of: same size pot, same size plant, same weather conditions, same temperature, did it at the same time, same amount of soil (b) road sign; blue – the soil is acidic/has a pH below 6; add alkali (lime or any other alkali)
  3. (A) gravitational potential, kinetic; chemical, kinetic; (b) light travels faster than sound; A: air resistance (friction or drag); B: weight (gravity)
  4. (A) Determine how long laundry takes to dry when there are puddles on the floor and when there aren’t (b) 1. how rainy/wet/windy it is or the temperature; 2. how stretched the clothes are, how wet they are or the material (b) evaporate (d) B; A and B
  5. (A) Any of: you don’t have to build a rocket every time, each “launch” costs less than a rocket, less space junk, less CO2 produced (b) 24 hours; any two from: satellite TV, weather monitoring, espionage, telecommunications, satellite navigation, animal tracking, observing planets and stars (b) carbon dioxide (CO2) > carbon (C) + oxygen (O2) (d) sharing costs, expertise, technology, personnel or resources or building relationships; language issues, workload arguments, costs, etc.

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